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Thread: James Diedrich Hallum, 5/18/32 - 7/19/16

  1. #71
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    Default Conclusion

    My last speculation was about why there may be a lack of boat racing stories worth telling by folks who spent a large portion of their life enjoying the racing action; I tried to imagine how that might happen. Over decades of racing, each person and their contemporaries have many many memories. My guess was that a large portion of those memories would best fit into a scenario where the racers involved in those many repeated events were speaking to each other, reliving an experience each had and involving the other person. Those are quite personal experiences and most meaningful to those directly involved.

    Another notably outstanding event memory may be worth writing because it illustrates some sort of important detail and is probably what the Forum is mostly about. That is also my guess.

    My overall end comment in that writing was speculating that, in each type of motor racing done for a major portion of a lifetime, the people who finally are no longer racing (for whatever reason) have a very large set of personal, probably enjoyable, memories but those folks in general are similar in their choices of stories to tell. They may be very selective, very reserved or silent. In that respect, all motor racing (and maybe any type of racing) may be quite similar. A possible metaphor of “... been there, did that forever, good times,... gone fishin’..” may fit.

    The real issue of a struggle to put personal thoughts to text is without doubt a problem. Bill Van S correctly lists the better set of reasons for that effect including those of typing and using current systems.

    The handy feature of the BRF Forum that can be useful for any speed of typing is that the story can be typed off line using any text editor or writing program and taking as much time as needed to finish. Any saved text can be worked and reworked without time limit unless there is some time limit on the computer itself. It is bound to be a real chore to hunt-n-peck type for a long time but a worthwhile story can result. That saved text, copied using a menu “text only” option will easily “paste” into the thread Reply window you have opened. You can fiddle with it there if you wish and if you use the Advanced reply option you can add a header title.
    My guessing continues with the thought that few Forum contributors do not already know this.
    Whizz--Bang, log in, open whatever reply window needed, paste, done, gone.

    I did, and still do, have very limited amount of tales to write about as I have explained to Smitty. Those and a couple added are pretty much done now. I do not think there is much left that would not drift into unneeded opinion.

    Jim Hallum mailed a set of three DVD’s to me several months before he died. Today I discovered that my current iMac OS (still several generations old) does not have the easy disc copy feature of the previous OS. My plan is to make a couple of copies. One set is promised to Smitty and the other will go to Boss Ron Hill so he can enjoy the Anzani details in first person. A worthwhile contribution. Ron’s address is on a box of A-class props sent about 2010. If necessary I will fire up the old Windows machine to do the DVD copy.

    Russ Rotzler >172-R; pal Jim Price> 250-R; 1960 testing at Lake Sammamish
    1960 J&I testing L.S..jpeg

  2. #72
    Team Member DeanFHobart's Avatar
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    Rex,

    Is the Cabover a Jones or a Ben Hur.... Or?.... Fine Craft?

    Thanks, Dean
    Dean Hobart

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    Default It's an Entrop ...

    Quote Originally Posted by DeanFHobart View Post
    Rex,

    Is the Cabover a Jones or a Ben Hur.... Or?.... Fine Craft?

    Thanks, Dean
    ===
    The cabover is the 1955 Hugh Entrop hull, 11 ft. 4 in., which he ran that year using a M 55-h. It is his second cabover hull, the first version ran in 1954 using a M KG-9. His third hull was a version for Doc Jones' PR powered COH. Dick Brunes ran 172-R mostly in DSH (that's why the extended steering wheel) for several years and I bought it for racing FOH in 1960 using the same M 55-H. DOH & FOH were separated about the end of 1960. Entrop's next two hulls were 13 ft. for the M 75-H straightaway and course racing. There were a couple of near copies of those early Entrop 11 ft. course hulls built by Seattle area racers. Probably the best one was by Bill Farr using the dim's from the 1954 hull. It was fast but needed the configuration of the 1955 hull to handle the speeds in the 1960's.

    And, by the way, Hubert told me (in answer to my questions) that his original cabover designs were his own. His Wind Tunnel Model Design friends helped with text book basic calculations of aerodynamics, balance, and Ground Effect, (not on company time, and most certainly not wind tunnel time). His few design conversations with Ted Jones were for Ted to find what Hugh had learned, not the reverse.
    Russ R.

  4. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ron Hill View Post
    I remember looking Gerry Wallin's boat over at the Modesto Kilos. Many things went through my head. The main thing at the time was a "B" (350 CC) going 100 MPH.

    I thought then, and I still do, this was a "D" Quickie, shaved to a "HATCH" as my dad made one like this when he put his 60-42 Evinrude on a "D" Quickie. Quickies have built in "KICK OUT", my dad never liked that. He liked things running parallel.

    I can't tell from the picture but wasn't the motor bolted straight, and the rudder was moveable.

    I got several cleavers from Cary, for Lon Stevens, when was breaking F Hydro records. They looked a lot like this propeller.
    ====
    Ron, that's a "nope" on the 100mph Anzani foot & fin guesses. I am fussing with making a copy of Hallum's DVD telling all details of that B motor. I will send a copy to you (as mentioned earlier) when I find a way past the limits of my later OS which removed the former easy disc copy feature. Hallum made this DVD for Bill Tenney; the file is time stamped 2007. You will find it quite interesting I think. Thanks for your Forum efforts.
    Russ Rotzler
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    Likes Ron Hill liked this post

  5. #75
    Team Member DeanFHobart's Avatar
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    Russ,

    Wasn't that Bill Farr hull later the boat that Bobby Waite used for his many Sammamish Slough wins in FOH? I think it usually shows up at the Slough reunion race.

    Thanks, Dean
    Dean Hobart

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    IIRC, Waite's cabover was one of two built by a fellow named Jim King, seems like he was from somewhere around Olympia. At one point either Waite or Don Haack had installed a piece of shiny (looked chromed but probably polished aluminum) piece of tubing on the left side of the cockpit, sticking nearly a foot above the top edge of the cockpit to keep one's fanny in the boat when bouncing around a rough corner; I joked with them that it was their handicapped grab-rail.

    By the way, "IIRC" ("If I Recall Correctly") is a prime caveat in anything I post here, and I welcome and encourage anyone with a better memory or information to correct anything I post. To any who are worried about "getting it wrong," nobody who is posting here is judgmental or fussy, and many of us have hit senior-citizen status years ago and are very forgiving of memory misfires.

    About the surfacing lower unit in the photo, IIRC (!!!!!) it was an A/B/C size Quicky with 16:21 gears, and with a homemade propeller shaft (of ETD=150, again IIRC) and homemade cone. The engine was kicked under so that the shaft angle was 6 degrees to the bottom of the boat (to make it prop-ride), and the bottom of the cone was then about parallel to the bottom. I recall being surprised and impressed that those poor little 16:21 gears would stand up to the power and to the slapping of that big 2-blade prop entering the water. Jim said that one of the not-so-good points of this style of surfacing lower unit was that because the bulb was positioned a lot farther below the bottom of the boat than a regular racing unit would be on an ordinary tail-dragger hydro, it created quite a lot of drag until the boat finally started prop-riding. Years afterward, he speculated that maybe some sort of small step in the bottom, a couple of inches wide and directly in front of part of that draggy bulb could have been beneficial. Now, I THINK I have all that about right, but this would be a fine time for Ron Anderson to chime in and give us the straight dope. Hallum did build another surfacing unit a little later, using a D Quickie, for bigger engines.

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    Default Early Entrop hull copies...

    Quote Originally Posted by DeanFHobart View Post
    Russ,

    Wasn't that Bill Farr hull later the boat that Bobby Waite used for his many Sammamish Slough wins in FOH? I think it usually shows up at the Slough reunion race.

    Thanks, Dean
    ===
    Dean; pretty good chance that I will fumble the details on the Farr, Waite cabover Q.

    The long answer, (I obviously am not inclined toward “one liners”), is that the Region 10 F/DOH hulls in 1959 were mostly Karelson cabovers and maybe some conventional Swift types. I do not think a large Sid Craft had arrived West and Ron Jones hulls were a year or two in the future. I was advised by both Hal Tolford and Entrop that the most affordable and probably best D/F hull available was sitting idle with Dick Brunes. It was the #2 Entrop hull.
    I bought it in time for the 1960 racing season.

    I was surprised a few times to see “copies” showed up to race, never at the same time. I think that there were two of them, similar in appearance to my 1955 hull but different since they were from the first Entrop cabover. At some point I think that I learned who built which hull but that is gone now. There were strong finish appearance differenced in the two copies. I will also guess that they influenced the Karelson designs.

    The Farr hull appeared for racing again in 1961 & 1962. Then owned by a fellow who lived in an east lakeside upscale area maybe a half mile north of the L. Wash. floating bridge east end. It had very distinctive rich grained plywood skins and was extremely well cared for. It did not run the Slough to avoid damage. I cannot remember that owner’s name, a successful businessman. Went to his home one time, very nice fellow, and the hull was carefully stored for next season. He had an excellent current 55-H.

    I do not know what became of that hull but Waite was also running at times during that whole period so was a separate hull. Both hulls were marginal for holding the nose down at speeds near 75 mph which is the reason for Entrop’s second hull type.

    Bob Waite’s hull was nicely done but with a more standard grain plywood skin type. Vague memory has it that (Andy) Thompson may have been involved in building one of those two hulls. He was also the builder of the 250-R Calkins style runabout in the photo, run by Jim Henry and then Jim Price. I think his home/shop was near north L. Sammamish. I always thought of Farr’s & Waite’s cabovers as being Sammamish area boats.
    R.R.

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