Page 4 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast
Results 31 to 40 of 52

Thread: Bump Stocks !

  1. #31
    Team Member Master Oil Racing Team's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Sandia, Texas
    Posts
    5,094
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Smitty, it isn't so much the smuggling that's the root cause of the problem. It's the overprescribing of opiods, and the medical community that for years never understood or saw the problem coming down the turnpike. Someone had pain, the doctors check it out and prescribe a pill. Still didn't work..don't need surgery yet....give an opioid. The VA is very infamous for that. Many vets have gotten hooked, and many O.D.'d , and many committed suicide. I have a couple of friends whose sons had some pains because of high school football or something else that the Doc gave them opioids and they worked. Came back for more...they worked even better. The Doc gave them out whenever they wanted. Not the same doctor, but the same practice as AMA thought was just fine. These guys got hooked (not at the same time, or did stuff together) and ended up stealing from their parents, and friends and did whatever they could for a fix. Both went to drug rehab. One was a short term, come as you please as long as you pay, and he ended up in jail, probation, back in jail, and finally after a long time with some help from his parents church got clean. The other did a lot of stupid things and only for the grace of God was not killed or arrested and his parents spent thirty grand in a facility (not a chain) that was God based and got him clean. Both these kids are now straight and raising families, but it never would have happened if the doctor cared about the patient and not just stopping the pain. That's what I'm talking about. And if we could get rid of this mindset of giving pills to all adolescents from kindergarten through high school to keep them from being restless in class to being able to focus, then a lot of the problems would cease to exist. It's these dime store, pill prescribing doctors and the pill factories that are getting people from all ages hooked on drugs that creates the demand. Once the doctors, pharmacies, and pill factories quit pumping out the opiods to be given out as candy to hook young kids , then the demand will come down.


    Likes Powerabout, Al Lang liked this post

  2. #32
    Team Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Singapore/Melbourne/Italy
    Posts
    1,143
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    time to bring back LSD as its not addictive
    does it do anything for pain?

  3. #33
    Team Member Master Oil Racing Team's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Sandia, Texas
    Posts
    5,094
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Remember Timothy Leary or was it Oleary. He was a professor at Harvard or one of the Ivy League schools and was a celebrated proponent and did experimentation. There is much literature about him and songs about his journey into his own mind. From what I remember about what kids said about LSD is that your mind wandered out into fields of somewhere and never found your way back. Then when you thought you were coming out of a haze one of your tripper friends was there with a joint or something else. At that age and in that condition, you don't feel pain. All you connect it to is when you thought you could fly, and the next morning someone showed you where you took off from. So in that case, it helped the pain at the time it happened.



  4. #34
    Team Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Singapore/Melbourne/Italy
    Posts
    1,143
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Master Oil Racing Team View Post
    Remember Timothy Leary or was it Oleary. He was a professor at Harvard or one of the Ivy League schools and was a celebrated proponent and did experimentation. There is much literature about him and songs about his journey into his own mind. From what I remember about what kids said about LSD is that your mind wandered out into fields of somewhere and never found your way back. Then when you thought you were coming out of a haze one of your tripper friends was there with a joint or something else. At that age and in that condition, you don't feel pain. All you connect it to is when you thought you could fly, and the next morning someone showed you where you took off from. So in that case, it helped the pain at the time it happened.
    Yes the History channel has a show about him in the drug wars series, showing how unconventional thinking might damage the old school politics so Nixon invented the drug wars to put them all in prison ( LSD was not illegal up to them) for that to work well the US was then flooded with drugs.
    African Americans used Marijuana so the penalties for that was higher than for coke as rich whites used that.
    Of course neither dope or lsd users are a major threat to public safety.
    You couldn't make up a storey that good. Now look at the result.

    Look at all the advancements in technology/music in the USA prior to Nixon...one wonders?

  5. #35
    Quincy Welding/ Racing Original Looper 1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    548
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Freddie Freddie Freddie ! What about all of the victims that Freddie sold drugs to?

    What about all the abuse those druggies caused themselves and their children? Loss of support from a druggie mother and father, no one to help with homework for school, no one to cook healthy food for the child, no parent with a compass to supervise the child and give good oversite and competent direction.

    What about loss of work by the parents? What about the life long welfare cost ? What about all the innocent taxpayer victims that pay for the free health care for these directionless parents and helpless children?

    What about the innocent taxpayers that have to pay for the prison system later on when most of those kids get in trouble because of those druggie parents and their lack of concern? Because the parents were stoned when the child needed love and direction early in life, in their early years.

    What about all the cost to the taxpayers for the extra police needed for the extra crime? What about all the extra cost to the innocent taxpayers for all the public social workers needed to fill in for druggie mommies and daddies?

    Where is the march for the decent and responsible taxpayers citizens that keep society from collapsing? Due to the selfish and short term profit industry that we all feel the effects of on a daily basis.

    I know this topic isn't as sexy to talk about as new sport stadiums for the rich or dancing with the stars. No wonder we are failing as a country, our rational policies have been inverted, I think, too frequently, by selfish and short sighted design of the ruling Elite.


    Nixon had to pay off the money changers to keep his promise to get us out of the Viet Nam war.

    He did this by letting the illegal drugs flow freely into the U.S. and he also opened up China

    so the money changers could put the slaves there to work making things and then platforming those things back

    into the American Market for huge profits... even better than the war was producing for the Money Changers at the

    time, add in all the extra money the global shipping made the Rockefeller oil and energy trust,

    moving all the slave made goods all over the world, and you see how things were then for the Global Elite (and to a high degree the same now)

    with endless wars and endless profits for the Elite while the borders are still open to illegal drug flows and terrorist & poor to

    come to America !


    It's all a big money game for the Global Elite money changers that run the media, schools, the banks,

    and most peoples minds that are way too lazy to study and figure things out, i.e. the Truth, by rationally following the Money !


    Regards,

    Paul

    PS


    "We are grateful to the Washington Post, The New York Times, Time
    Magazine and other great publications whose directors have attended
    our meetings and respected their promises of discretion for almost
    forty years."

    "It would have been impossible for us to develop our plan for the world
    if we had been subjected to the lights of publicity during those years.
    But, the world is now more sophisticated and prepared to march towards a
    world government. The supranational sovereignty of an intellectual elite
    and world bankers is surely preferable to the national
    auto-determination practiced in past centuries."
    Quote by:
    David Rockefeller
    (1915- ) Internationalist billionaire, CFR kingpin, founder of the Trilateralist Commission, World Order Godfather
    Date:
    June 1991 Baden, Germany
    Source:
    Bilderberger Meeting, Baden, Germany

  6. #36
    Team Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Singapore/Melbourne/Italy
    Posts
    1,143
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    yes the machine that put people in prison for long stretches (even life)for what is not illegal in some states and some parts of the rest of the world, is all about money.
    It was engineered for one sector of the community.
    It starts with a policeman arresting you and flows all the way to their customers in prison. The whole chain is viewed as profit and not a loss like the rest of the world views it.
    Of course the tax payer is a sucker here.
    The US would be better off if they handed out free joints to young black people. ( maybe even let them grow it)
    http://thehill.com/blogs/pundits-blo...-incarceration

  7. #37
    Team Member DeanFHobart's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Lake Sammamish, Washington and Indio, California
    Posts
    337
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Powerabout View Post
    Yes the History channel has a show about him in the drug wars series, showing how unconventional thinking might damage the old school politics so Nixon invented the drug wars to put them all in prison ( LSD was not illegal up to them) for that to work well the US was then flooded with drugs.
    African Americans used Marijuana so the penalties for that was higher than for coke as rich whites used that.
    Of course neither dope or lsd users are a major threat to public safety.
    You couldn't make up a storey that good. Now look at the result.

    Look at all the advancements in technology/music in the USA prior to Nixon...one wonders?
    Just Google 'CPUSA 45 Goals 1963' and it will make sense.
    Dean Hobart

  8. #38
    Quincy Welding/ Racing Original Looper 1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    548
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    For those that insist that we legally let people use all the drugs they want I ask who will hire all these dysfunctional undependable druggies ?

    What can we the taxpayers expect from them in self sufficient employment without we the taxpayers picking up the costly support they will all need, in my opinion, from low paying to little to live on wages jobs that will have to compete with all the low cost global low valued workforce competition.

    How will they support themselves without costly Government help? Victimless crimes? I say B.S. -- not to the innocent & responsible taxpayers.
    HOW ABOUT FOCUSING ON FACTUAL REALITY !

    WHY DO POLICE PROFILE BLACKS !

    **************COMMON SENSE *********************

    MURDER
    White:4,382 = 1.77 per 100k.
    Black:4,498 = 11.83 per 100k.
    Blacks commit murder at a rate 6.68 times that of Whites.

    RAPE
    White:10,990 = 4.45 per 100k.
    Black:5,428 = 1,428 per 100k.
    Blacks commit rape at a rate 3.21 times that of Whites.

    ROBBERY
    White:41,962 = 17 per 100k.
    Black:56,948 = 150 per 100k.
    Blacks commit robbery at a rate 9 times that of Whites.

    AGG. ASSUALT
    White:208,081 = 84 per 100k.
    Black:112,325 = 295 per 100k.
    Blacks commit agg. assualt at a rate 3.5 times that of Whites.

    BURGLARY
    White:157,252 = 64 per 100k.
    Black:73,960 = 195 per 100k.
    Blacks commit burglary at a rate 3 times that of Whites.

    LARCENY-THEFT
    White:663,360 = 269 per 100k.
    Black:286,844 = 755 per 100k.
    Blacks commit larceny at a rate 2.8 times that of Whites.

    MOTOR VEHICLE THEFT
    White:44,674 =18 per 100k.
    Black:28,510 = 75 per 100k.
    Blacks commit motor vehicle theft at a rate 4 times that of Whites.

    OVERALL VIOLENT CRIME
    White:265,754 = 107 per 100k.
    Black:179,636 =473 per 100k.

    OVERALL BLACKS COMMIT CRIMES AT A RATE 4.4(440%) TIMES THAT OF WHITES.


    I am tired of hearing the misrepresentations out there that there are more whites on welfare than blacks. That is true only if you look at the raw numbers. But it does not take into account the fact that the population of whites and blacks is not equal in the U.S. There are almost 6 times as many whites in this country as blacks. The statistics below on welfare recipients breaks down the numbers on welfare as a percentage by race BUT NOT BY RACE AS A PERCENTAGE OF THE TOTAL POPULATION. That is the dirty little secret they try to omit.

    You have to look at each race's total representation of the population to get the true picture of who's on welfare.

    Statistics show welfare recipients as:
    White 38.8%
    Black 39.8
    Hispanic 15.7
    Asian 2.4
    other 3.3

    HOWEVER, the entire population of 318.9 million in the U.S. consists of:
    White 77.7%
    Black 13.2
    Hispanic 17.2

    Blacks make up just 13% of the population but receive almost 40% of all U.S. welfare benefits paid out. So therefore 6 times as many blacks are actually on welfare as whites as a percentage of their race.


    Welfare
    zombies on pot that cannot be hired for productive jobs ! only America's Media
    Mafia would sell this as good !


    The people that control Obama, and some in Congress in my opinion, want to let the black hood leaders sell drugs and run prostitution without the law or police stopping bothering or arresting any of them wherever they are.

    I also believe Obama had threatened to turn loose the Justice Dept on the CIA for drug running and the too big to fail Big Banks for Money Laundering if they don't help him persuade the Big Media to back off on the Blacks and their crimes and spin the police as the bad Guys so the Hood runners and Pimps get the political cover Obama and the Damacraps have promised them for their political and economic loyalty, ie campaign Funds.

    But what he fails to realize or care about is the total social cost this currently is on responsible taxpayers and later on when the children without father supervision at home commit more crime and the mothers are on permanent welfare with drug problems for life. The children then continue the cycle and cost to responsible society. It's a vicious and corrupt cycle that runs deep in our public service sector also top to bottom. This is what I believe is being played out and makes sense to Me! The Big picture Here ?

    Regards,

    Paul

    PS

    Eye on the News
    HEATHER MAC DONALD
    The Myth of Criminal-Justice Racism
    Testimony before the United States Senate Committee on the Judiciary, October 19, 2015
    October 22, 2015

    Earlier this week, Heather Mac Donald testified on criminal justice and the deincarceration movement before the Senate Judiciary Committee. Her opening statement follows.

    Chairman Grassley, Ranking Member Leahy, and members of the Committee, my name is Heather Mac Donald. I am honored to address you today regarding the Sentencing Reform and Corrections Act of 2015. I am the Thomas W. Smith fellow at the Manhattan Institute for Policy Research, a public policy think tank in New York City. I have written extensively on law enforcement and criminal justice.

    Today I want to examine the broader political context of the Sentencing Reform and Corrections Act. We are in the midst of a national movement for deincarceration and decriminalization. That movement rests on the following narrative: America’s criminal justice system, it is said, has become irrationally draconian, ushering in an era of so-called “mass incarceration.” The driving force behind “mass incarceration,” the story goes, is a misconceived war on drugs. As President Barack Obama said in July in Philadelphia: “The real reason our prison population is so high” is that we have “locked up more and more nonviolent drug offenders than ever before, for longer than ever before.” In popular understanding, prisons and jails are filled with harmless pot smokers.

    The most poisonous claim in the dominant narrative is that our criminal justice system is a product and a source of racial inequity. The drug war in particular is said to be infected by racial bias. “Mass incarceration” is allegedly destroying black communities by taking fathers away from their families and imposing crippling criminal records on released convicts. Finally, prison is condemned as a huge waste of resources.

    Nothing in this dominant narrative is true. Prison remains a lifetime achievement award for persistence in criminal offending. Drug enforcement is not the driving factor in the prison system, violent crime is. Even during the most rapid period of prison growth from 1980 to 1990, increased sentences for violent crime played a larger role than drug sentences in the incarceration build up. Since 1999, violent offenders have accounted for all of the increase in the national prison census.

    Today, only 16 percent of state prisoners are serving time for drug offenses—nearly all of them for trafficking. Drug possession accounts for only 3.6 percent of state prisoners. Drug offenders make up a larger portion of the federal prison caseload—about 50 percent—but only 13 percent of the nation’s prisoners are under federal control. In 2014, less than 1 percent of sentenced drug offenders in federal court were convicted of simple drug possession; the rest were convicted of trafficking. The size of America’s prison population is a function of our violent crime rate. The U.S. homicide rate is seven times higher than the combined rate of 21 Western nations plus Japan, according to a 2011 study by researchers of the Harvard School of Public Health and UCLA School of Public Health.

    The most dangerous misconception about our criminal justice system is that it is pervaded by racial bias. For decades, criminologists have tried to find evidence proving that the overrepresentation of blacks in prison is due to systemic racial inequity. That effort has always come up short. In fact, racial differences in offending account for the disproportionate representation of blacks in prison. A 1994 Justice Department survey of felony cases from the country’s 75 largest urban areas found that blacks actually had a lower chance of prosecution following a felony than whites. Following conviction, blacks were more likely to be sentenced to prison, however, due to their more extensive criminal histories and the gravity of their current offense.

    The drug war was not a war on blacks. It was the Congressional Black Caucus that demanded a federal response to the 1980s crack epidemic, including more severe penalties for crack trafficking. The Rockefeller drug laws in New York State were also an outgrowth of black political pressure to eradicate open-air drug markets. This local demand for suppression of the drug trade continues today. Go to any police-community meeting in Harlem, South-Central Los Angeles, or Anacostia in Washington, D.C., and you will hear some variant of the following plea: “We want the dealers off the streets, you arrest them and they are back the next day.” Such voices are rarely heard in the media.

    Incarceration is not destroying the black family. Family breakdown is in fact the country’s most serious social problem, and it is most acute in black communities. But the black marriage rate was collapsing long before incarceration started rising at the end of the 1970s, as my colleague Kay Hymowitz has shown. Indeed, the late Senator Daniel Patrick Moynihan issued his prescient call for attention to black out-of-wedlock child-rearing in 1965, just as that era’s deincarceration and decriminalization movement was gaining speed.

    It is crime, not incarceration, that squelches freedom and enterprise in urban areas. And there have been no more successful government programs for liberating inner-city residents from fear and disorder than proactive policing and the incapacitation of criminals.




    Compared with the costs of crime, prison is a bargain. The federal system spends about $6 billion on incarceration; the state system spent $37 billion in 2010 on institutional corrections. The economic, social, and psychological costs of uncontrolled crime and drug trafficking dwarf such outlays. And prison spending is a minute fraction of the $1.3 trillion in taxpayer dollars devoted to means-tested federal welfare programs, as Senator Sessions has documented.




    To be sure, the federal drug penalties are not sacrosanct. But though all sentencing schemes are ultimately arbitrary, our current penalty structure arguably has been arrived at empirically through trial and error. Sentences were increased incrementally in response to the rising crime rates of the 1960s and 1970s. Those rising crime rates were themselves the product of an earlier era of deincarceration and decriminalization. Sentences lengthened until they took a serious bite out of crime, in conjunction with the policing revolution of the 1990s.

    Violent crime is currently shooting up again in cities across the country. Police officers are backing away from proactive enforcement in response to the yearlong campaign that holds that police are the greatest threat facing young black men today. Officers encounter increasing hostility and resistance when they make a lawful arrest. With pedestrian stops, criminal summons, and arrests falling precipitously in urban areas, criminals are becoming emboldened. While I do not think that the current crime increase is a result of previous changes in federal sentencing policy, it behooves the government to tread cautiously in making further changes. However, I unequivocally support the “productive activities” component of Section 202 of the Act, to the extent that it aims to engage all prisoners in work.

    In closing, let me say that the committee would provide an enormous public service if it could rebut the myth that the criminal justice system is racist. Thank you for your attention.

    Heather Mac Donald is the Thomas W. Smith Fellow at the Manhattan Institute and a City Journal contributing editor.
    Likes ProHydroRacer liked this post

  9. #39
    Team Member Master Oil Racing Team's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Sandia, Texas
    Posts
    5,094
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    All this is too much for me to read. My head is busting open, so I will try to lighten it up a little bit, but staying on the subject.

    You guys can research this stuff if you want, but I'm just going to go with what I remember. Sometime in the 60's I believe a black guy was arrested, brought to trial and convicted based upon a few seeds of marijuana found in his car or house, or something that was tied to him. His name was Lee Otis. I think he was from Houston, Texas. Laws were very tough back then, but for some reason Lee Otis seemed to get a very harsh penalty. Don't know if he was a career criminal or what, but he was sentenced to thirty years at Huntsville for a few seeds.

    In 1972 Dolph Briscoe was running for reelection as governor in the state of Texas. There was a movement among Texas campuses around the state to reduce the harsh laws for possession of marijuana, and Lee Otis's sentence was the perfect venue for the activists to draw attention to the extremely harsh penalties for marijuana possession. Lee Otis' case was very harsh, but no one mentioned why that was, and I never heard. Could have been he was someone who should have been cleared of the streets many years before, but what I seem to remember was that it was a "hanging judge" that wanted to make an example.

    During Governor Briscoe's campaign he gave a talk in a town with a lot of college kids. Could have been at Waco, College Station, Austin, or any city with a large population of college kids. During his stump speech, the students were hollering "Free Lee Otis...free Lee Otis.....free Lee Otis." They were very loud and never stopped. They were wanting the laws changed and injustices for harsh penalties stopped. I think the Governor shortened up his speech because of the large and vocal crowd and when he got backstage he asked his top aide "What have they got against beans?" Governor Briscoe was confused, and amongst all the shouting back at him he thought they were shouting "Fri..jo..les!" Frijoles...beans.



  10. #40
    Team Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Singapore/Melbourne/Italy
    Posts
    1,143
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Master Oil Racing Team View Post
    All this is too much for me to read. My head is busting open, so I will try to lighten it up a little bit, but staying on the subject.

    You guys can research this stuff if you want, but I'm just going to go with what I remember. Sometime in the 60's I believe a black guy was arrested, brought to trial and convicted based upon a few seeds of marijuana found in his car or house, or something that was tied to him. His name was Lee Otis. I think he was from Houston, Texas. Laws were very tough back then, but for some reason Lee Otis seemed to get a very harsh penalty. Don't know if he was a career criminal or what, but he was sentenced to thirty years at Huntsville for a few seeds.

    In 1972 Dolph Briscoe was running for reelection as governor in the state of Texas. There was a movement among Texas campuses around the state to reduce the harsh laws for possession of marijuana, and Lee Otis's sentence was the perfect venue for the activists to draw attention to the extremely harsh penalties for marijuana possession. Lee Otis' case was very harsh, but no one mentioned why that was, and I never heard. Could have been he was someone who should have been cleared of the streets many years before, but what I seem to remember was that it was a "hanging judge" that wanted to make an example.

    During Governor Briscoe's campaign he gave a talk in a town with a lot of college kids. Could have been at Waco, College Station, Austin, or any city with a large population of college kids. During his stump speech, the students were hollering "Free Lee Otis...free Lee Otis.....free Lee Otis." They were very loud and never stopped. They were wanting the laws changed and injustices for harsh penalties stopped. I think the Governor shortened up his speech because of the large and vocal crowd and when he got backstage he asked his top aide "What have they got against beans?" Governor Briscoe was confused, and amongst all the shouting back at him he thought they were shouting "Fri..jo..les!" Frijoles...beans.
    Miss interpreting on a large scale...
    Ho Chi Min thought the USA was coming to recolonise after the French left.
    Same Happened in Malaysia to the British who were already there and trying to get he country into a position to give it back.
    Commies involved in both cases

Page 4 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 2 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 2 guests)

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •