Thread: Mercury Mark 40-H

  1. #811
    Team Member buff5's Avatar
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    Smile Martin 200 Running

    Al & Alan: I have extensivly tested the Martin 200 racing version within the last 3 years, 9 set up runs the first year, late fall, 50 runs the next summer & 22 runs this summer, with a total of 81 runs, for a total on the water test time of 20 hours. I have run many KG7H's, MK20H's, Model 6nhr Hot-Rods, Mod Wizard Super 10's Cris-Craft K-10 Commanders, etc & I can confirm, that with enough set up time & testing that I am VERY pleased with the Martin 200's performance. All these motors are 'Closed Up Gas Burners", of course The 200 has much more power "out of the hole", than all the other motors I have mentioned, I also like the counter clockwise rotation of the prop with the 15-16 gears which greatly helps boat control in the turns. Yes the powerhead will put out about 25-26 H.P. at 6500 r's, but that is it, as the popett valve return springs will 'float out" above those rpm's & it immeadiatly will drop crankcase pressure & act like the fuel pump is failing. Alan, I run strictly a 1949 Van Pelt 'B" runabout BUT the Michigan AJ 530 is the worst prop I have ever run on the 200, might be ok on a hydro, but not a runabout. The Oakland-Johnson OJ M1 is a much better prop. Do not worry about pitching, as I have found any racing prop every made for the 200, & I have tested them all, is pitched, "To Heavy", to allow 6500 rpm's on my runabout,rather running about 800 r's below that, but I am now running a prop I found out about that will allow up near 6500 r's with a 8" pitch, as the AJ530 is a 9 1/2" pitch with to small a diameter, which really tries to tear the transom of my Van Pelt with its slipping & catching on trying to get on plane. Also the water intake on the foot has to be modified, to assure a full force of water at all times, as any obstruction over the very high, frontal intake port will cause overheating & take out a head gasket. My 200 has not had any problems, starts easy & is still performing as good as ever, after the 81 runs. I can run about 1/2 hr on a 1 gal tank of fuel. I also run a steering bar tank, ala a 20h conversion to keep the engine center of gravity "Low Down". About next April 15th or so, back on the water up here in Northern Wisconsin!!!. Have fun, I do.

  2. #812
    Sam Cullis Mark75H's Avatar
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    Before someone gets the idea to just put heavier springs in their Martin for more revs ... the most common junk failure is the crankcase cracking around the intake valves because it is too thin and too brittle. The alloy is not one commonly used ... it seems to have more zinc in it that other outboards.
    Since 1925, about 150 different racing outboards have been made.


  3. #813
    Team Member buff5's Avatar
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    Default Martin 200 Popett Valve Springs

    Sam: You got that one right!, putting in heavier springs to raise the rpm's would be a no-no. I feel 6500 r's is just about right for the 200, those factory engineers were no fools & they knew what they were doing. Increasing valve spring pressure would also have a devastating effect of the cam follows, ie the cam lobes on the crank & on & on. I run all stock items, as were supplied at the factory. I also like the "Big Breather", aspects of the 200, ports & transfer ports etc are all large for this 20 C.I. engine & the 4 large valves leave in a lot of air & fuel, as does the carter model N carb. This motor never got out in sufficient quanities on the race course & for such a short period of time, before Martin closed their doors in the fall of 54. As less that 500 of each racing item was ordered by the factory, short hsg, short driveshaft etc, I doubt whether over 350 motors every got out & then only on the local circuits, with no real test, set up or run time to realize the full potential of the 200, most drivers just went back to their Merc's which were a proven motor, rather than waste any racing laps. Oh, also nearly forgot to mention, the stock rounded nose cone is superior to the pointed bullett racing come, much more efficient, as was noted by the engineer at the factory, but the Martin 'Powers to be", like the looks of the pointed cone, looked faster!! NOT!!!!!

  4. #814
    BoatRacingFacts VIP John Schubert T*A*R*T's Avatar
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    Default Martin 200

    Quote Originally Posted by buff5 View Post
    Al & Alan: I have extensivly tested the Martin 200 racing version within the last 3 years, 9 set up runs the first year, late fall, 50 runs the next summer & 22 runs this summer, with a total of 81 runs, for a total on the water test time of 20 hours. I have run many KG7H's, MK20H's, Model 6nhr Hot-Rods, Mod Wizard Super 10's Cris-Craft K-10 Commanders, etc & I can confirm, that with enough set up time & testing that I am VERY pleased with the Martin 200's performance. All these motors are 'Closed Up Gas Burners", of course The 200 has much more power "out of the hole", than all the other motors I have mentioned, I also like the counter clockwise rotation of the prop with the 15-16 gears which greatly helps boat control in the turns. Yes the powerhead will put out about 25-26 H.P. at 6500 r's, but that is it, as the popett valve return springs will 'float out" above those rpm's & it immeadiatly will drop crankcase pressure & act like the fuel pump is failing. Alan, I run strictly a 1949 Van Pelt 'B" runabout BUT the Michigan AJ 530 is the worst prop I have ever run on the 200, might be ok on a hydro, but not a runabout. The Oakland-Johnson OJ M1 is a much better prop. Do not worry about pitching, as I have found any racing prop every made for the 200, & I have tested them all, is pitched, "To Heavy", to allow 6500 rpm's on my runabout,rather running about 800 r's below that, but I am now running a prop I found out about that will allow up near 6500 r's with a 8" pitch, as the AJ530 is a 9 1/2" pitch with to small a diameter, which really tries to tear the transom of my Van Pelt with its slipping & catching on trying to get on plane. Also the water intake on the foot has to be modified, to assure a full force of water at all times, as any obstruction over the very high, frontal intake port will cause overheating & take out a head gasket. My 200 has not had any problems, starts easy & is still performing as good as ever, after the 81 runs. I can run about 1/2 hr on a 1 gal tank of fuel. I also run a steering bar tank, ala a 20h conversion to keep the engine center of gravity "Low Down". About next April 15th or so, back on the water up here in Northern Wisconsin!!!. Have fun, I do.
    The biggest issue that the Martin 200 had when competing with the 20H's & then the Hot Rods is that the water pick up was above the center line of the prop shaft. This prohibited using standard service planing type propellers that the 20H's & Hot Rods used & meant that the Martin gear case was deeper in the water & creating considerable drag. We all know that the Johnson KR's & SR's & all the other Pre war racing motors were similar. Gibby Peterman's best KR propeller was one that was made for the 200 but reworked by him. I always thought that the poppet valve set up would help acceleration but wondered why the Martin engineers built a gear case that was a hindrance to performance. Probably were afraid of being sued by Carl K. Out East the Matin 200's performance was far below that of the 20H as I raced against them in "B" stock hydro. Also, Lou Eppel before his illustrious career at OMC was working for Martin on the East coast & worked very hard to develop a dealer base for Martin & attempts to make the 200 comepetive, but the effort was not very successful.

  5. #815
    Team Member buff5's Avatar
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    Smile Martin 200 Racing Engine

    John: you are right in both respects, the poppet valve arrangement, & big breathing does allow for more acceleration & the high water intake on the 200 foot, does allow more foot drag. Not much one can do about that & in antique, non competitive running it really makes no difference as that last couple mph is not a issue. The limited prop selection for the 200 did not include any surfacer running props anyhow & the shallow clamp brkts do not allow much raising capabilties also, I compensate for that by trying to run the lightest 50's era boat & maintain my own personal body weight as low as possible, good excuse to not get overweight!! LOL Thanks much for your perspective & added information from way back then,which you personally observed, given more time back in 53-54, I am sure someone would have solved those problems, but again, why miss the time running, fooling around when there were plenty of other motors that did perform. My fun 55 years later is taking a underdog motor, which is not supposed to go, & make it go, everyone expects a Merc or Rod to run great, NOT a Martin 200, therin lies the challenge & the fun, from my prespective of course, & at this late date, FUN is what it is all about.

  6. #816
    Team Member MTECHMARINE's Avatar
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    Default Tabor City experience.

    Arrived Thursday after 660 mile drive with the D mod rig from Milton FL. Friday AM set the rig up and put her in the water for a test run. No leaks in the boat, that was a good sign!

    After a number of laps we opened it up a couple of times - what a trip! Now thats what I call a FAST boat!

    Like a car on the dirt track, I guess you have to develop a knack for sliding the boat around the turns. I was a bit intimidated by this ( read: scared s__tless) so the races were a learning experience for me. I got a couple of great starts but had to let 'em go in the 1st turn!

    The good news is the motor ran great right out of the box. Nothing fell off or broke, it was running at the finish which actually garnered me a 3rd place!

    The 2 assistants are foreground; BILL WALKER and his friend TOM FERNANDES. THANKS guys!!
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  7. #817
    BoatRacingFacts VIP Aeroliner's Avatar
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    Default Looking forward to next season.

    First of all I would like to wish everyone a very Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year. Also thanks to the folks that have added to this thread. When you start at the beginning it provides a great deal of information and some history. With winter upon us were starting the preparation for the next season. Doug Kay has a few projects that he is working on for me. The two 75-H engines I have are getting close to being done. They will be book ends and one will be chosen to run next year. I will be restoring Jerry Waldmans old Sid and our intent is to run it for fun and maybe a couple races. Hope to get some photos running next to the 75-H MOD engine Doug built a couple years ago. The next on the list will be a new 44 MOD engine along with a spare powerhead which I will be giving to a friend. From there we might be building possibly a couple B-1 engine to run on the new MRC we obtained last Summer.
    The most exciting thing that were building is a whole new engine configutarion. One clue is all I will give! Like all our engines it will run on a Brinkman tower. We will take photos during the build and will only post them when the engine is finished.

    Alan

  8. #818
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    Default 75-H progress

    Over the last couple months Doug Kay has been working on the restoration of my 75-H S/N 1200072 and building a matching clone that we will run for fun. During the process we have found that a great number of the parts in the lower units are in sad shape. Most of the shafts needed to be hard chrome plated and ground back to size. Water pump cartridges were so bad that we had new ones cast. Additionally the parts that hold things together were dammage to such an extent that they would not have held up to a season of running. Here are a few photos of some of the things that have been done. If anyone would like additional photos of the details let me know and I will post them.

    Alan
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  9. #819
    Team Member Jeff Lytle's Avatar
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    Very nice work! (Nice bench kitty as well! )

  10. #820
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    Default 75-h

    Thanks Jeff,
    My plan is to keep 0092 in show condition but to run the clone on a Jerry Waldman Sid that I am restoring. Hopefully we will run the 75-H MOD engine on my Ropp and the clone next to it at the same time to get some photos and let the folks take a walk down memory pathway of boat racings past. Both engines will be as correct as we can make them with the help of Doug Kays dedication and craftsmenship. 0072 is our input correct sample plus all the old data I have accumulated should make them as Mercury delivered them.

    Alan

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