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Thread: An Amazing Story: Part 3

  1. #61
    Team Member racnbns's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Master Oil Racing Team View Post
    Been looking for the best scanner. Things have changed a lot . Firured sin ce I get a new scanner I need to be able to have acess to things to scan. So I started to clean up my darkroom and file things away, so that I can not only find what I want, but aksi pit things back so I don't let things get so cluttered again. ince I can't hardly see anymore, I have to take things slowly, and pt things back where they belong.. I don't have my computer glassrs on an there mey me a lot of spelling errorors. I just wanted to give an update and get back to cleaning out my darkroom which has been a mess for three or more years.
    Wayne---I can't begin to comprehend what your going thru with the vision problem. You have done and contributed so much to all aspects of Boat Racing that all of us Readers of BRF would like you to keep on as you can. After all it's the meaning not the spelling and we'll figure it out and enjoy every word of your articles.

    I'll catch ya later,
    Bruce
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  2. #62
    Team Member Master Oil Racing Team's Avatar
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    Thanks much Bruce. Some days are good, some not so.Got a lot done yesterday And can see the light of day. Except I still have about 20 rolls of film to develop from the 80's and 90's. can't trust to send them out. Have to buy new chemicals. One good thing.... When I open my cassettes to load the film on the reel....it is done in total darkness. I can't see a thing. It's all done by feel and I have done that since 1967, so my eyes don't count.



  3. #63
    Team Member Master Oil Racing Team's Avatar
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    I picked up a new scanner last week. Try to set it up this coming week. Lot to catch up on. Started to straighten up my darkroom a month ago. Since I can't see much anymore, I quit laying stuff around, and now put it back where it belongs so I can find it again. In the long run, it will probably save a lot more time by finding stuff where it is supposed to be. And look much nicer.



  4. #64
    Team Member DeanFHobart's Avatar
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    Wayne,

    My dad used to do his own development and then printing and enlarging. He had a red light to work under so he could see. Is that something that is still used?
    Dean Hobart

  5. #65
    Team Member Master Oil Racing Team's Avatar
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    Yes Dean, except it is a yellow light now. When you open the cassette with the film, or unwind the exposed film from the roll, it always has to be in complete darkness. You have to grasp the leading edge of the film and guide it into the stainless steel or plastic reel in order to develop the film. It is a very delicate situation to spool the film around the reels, then drop the spools into the developing canisters. After all the canisters loaded with exposed film are capped, then lights can be turned on. All development of the negatives can be done in daylight. When the film is dried, then the negatives can be put in the projector.

    There are several trays with chemical baths that are needed to make prints. That's where the yellow or I should say an amber "safelight" comes into play. After the photo paper is exposed to the tested light , and this is done under the ''safelight", it is dipped into the developing tray. That is why the amber light is necessary. You have to be able to see the image start to appear...come to the maximum development...and then suddenly dip the photo into a tray that will shut off any further development. After a few minutes rinse, the photo paper is placed in a tray to "fix" the image permanent This takes about ten minutes, then this solution is completely washed away. A dip in a water bath to clear all the chemicals and a long rinse will make for a wet print to dry and last for a long time. It's the light in the darkroom development time that allows you to do what it takes to make the print Dean.



  6. #66
    Team Member DeanFHobart's Avatar
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    Wayne,

    Ok, my dad only did black and white in those days.... in the 1950’s... and before. I still have his picture albums... good stuff.

    Dean...........
    Dean Hobart

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